Break the Silence Speaker Series: Me Too Movement Founder Tarana Burke

Our VOICE is excited to welcome Tarana Burke, founder of the Me Too Movement, for our 2019 Break the Silence Speaker Series event.

The Me Too Movement has inspired survivors of sexual violence from all over the world to find pathways to healing. From her perspective as a survivor and a silence-breaker, Tarana will talk about what it takes to turn a moment into a movement and will inspire us to take action to create a community free from sexual violence.

Partner with Our VOICE to sponsor Tarana Burke and the Break the Silence Speaker Series!

“Please know that our work is never ending. In fact, it’s just beginning.”
-Tarana Burke

 

 

WHEN

Thursday, March 14, 2019

Networking and cocktails, 5 p.m.-5:45 p.m.
Program begins, 6 p.m.
VIP Champagne Reception, immediately following event

WHERE

Renaissance Hotel Asheville
31 Woodfin Street
Asheville, NC 28801

TICKETS

$35 individual
$10 student
$100 VIP (includes reception)
$25/10 group rate

Please check back in 2019 for ticket sales.

SPONSORSHIP INFORMATION

Partner with Our VOICE to bring Tarana Burke to Asheville! Click here for sponsorship opportunities and to download the sponsorship packet.

For more information, contact Aiyanna Sezak-Blatt at 828-252-0562 ext. 102 or email aiyannasb@ourvoicenc.org.


About Tarana Burke

Tarana Burke started a revolution in 2006 when she first used the phrase Me Too in reference to her own sexual assault. More than 10 years later the Me Too Movement transformed into the viral #MeToo hashtag. Tarana was named a 2017 Time Magazine Person of the Year for her role in breaking the silence around sexual violence. The #metoo hashtag campaign has generated more than 13 million Facebook posts and tweets, emerging as a rallying cry for people everywhere who have survived sexual assault and sexual harassment.

Tarana Burke began ‘me too’ with young black women and girls from low wealth communities. She developed culturally informed curriculum to discuss sexual violence within the black community and in society at large. Similarly, the ‘me too’ movement seeks to support folks working within their communities to attend to the specific needs of their community/communities, i.e. supporting disabled trans survivors of color working to lead and craft events/toolkits/etc. with other disabled trans survivors. Tarana works under the banner of the movement, which is housed at the Brooklyn-based Girls for Gender Equity organization, where she serves as senior director.

For more information about Tarana Burke and the Me Too Movement, go to metoomvmt.org.